PM praises Sainsbury’s £1bn sustainability plan

Sainsbury’s is launching a £1billion scheme to makes its stores more sustainable. The supermarket chain’s 20 by 20 Sustainability Plan has won the backing of Prime Minister David Cameron. With […]

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By Vicky Ellis

Sainsbury’s is launching a £1billion scheme to makes its stores more sustainable. The supermarket chain’s 20 by 20 Sustainability Plan has won the backing of Prime Minister David Cameron.

With 20 points to act on, four key areas of the business have been picked for a sustainable revamp, including reducing Sainsbury’s operational carbon emissions by 30% by 2020 (on 2005 levels).

The chain says this will be achieved with new zero carbon stores, by installing renewable energy sources like wind and solar panels at existing stores. It plans to use renewable heat in most of its supermarkets by 2030.

Justin King, Sainsbury’s chief executive said: “If we are to meet the sustainability challenges that lie ahead, it is important that companies such as Sainsbury’s invest in the future right now. We do not see this plan as a luxury, it is rather, an essential investment that will ensure we can continue to provide customers with quality food at fair prices, sustainably.

Prime Minister David Cameron also voiced support for the scheme.

He said: “I welcome today’s announcement from Sainsbury’s. It is a great example of the principles of Every Business Commits – helping to create jobs and growth whilst also tackling our shared social and environmental challenges, investing in their workforce and in our communities, and building a bigger, stronger society.”

The supermarket chain also wants to create 50,000 new jobs in the UK within the next decade, double the amount of British-sourced food it sells, and expects to see 20,000 staff reach 20 years service there.

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