Zero carbon homes project tests energy storage

Scottish supplier SSE is testing out a new way of energy storage at its zero carbon homes project, which could cut the cost of green energy in the long run. […]

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By Vicky Ellis

Scottish supplier SSE is testing out a new way of energy storage at its zero carbon homes project, which could cut the cost of green energy in the long run.

The homes in Slough in the South East of England will use three 25kWh lithium-ion batteries which store energy from low carbon sources such as solar power.

The pilot project will look at what the benefits of energy storage are to a low voltage network, smaller regional networks which feed electricity into homes and businesses.

Smaller networks could take more of a strain as people start to use more low carbon energy. In the project, the batteries will be used to spread demand and power loads at different times throughout the day.

Alistair Steele, Project Manager of SSE Power Distribution said: “Our Zero Carbon Homes provide an excellent foundation to trial the batteries as there are multiple low carbon technologies including 65kW solar array, heat pumps and electric vehicles.”

Andrew Jones, Managing Director of S&C Electric Company Europe which is behind the technology said: “With a high uptake of low carbon technologies in a concentrated area, there is potential for voltage constraints on the feeder circuits.”

Storing energy in more local batteries would avoid needing to replace existing cables and power plants with bigger ones, he suggested, meaning less money spent on upgrades.