New standards for ‘positive’ smart meter installation experience

New rules and guidance aimed at protecting customers and making sure they receive a high standard of service when getting a smart meter installed have been launched today. The Smart […]

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By Priyanka Shrestha

New rules and guidance aimed at protecting customers and making sure they receive a high standard of service when getting a smart meter installed have been launched today.

The Smart Meter Installation Code of Practice (SMICoP) sets the minimum standards that energy suppliers have to follow when installing the device in people’s homes, with the aim of making sure the installation experience is positive for customers and they are clear as to what will happen during the process. The code also specifies that smart meter installers are to offer customers advice on energy efficiency and also bans sales activity being conducted during the installation.

The Smart Meter Data Guide, which is also being launched, outlines what data will be collected by energy suppliers and the choices consumers have about the amount of information their supplier can collect and how the information can be used.

The news follows the UK Government’s plans to replace 53 million gas and electricity meters by 2019 followed by a report suggesting the UK smart meter market could exceed £1 billion a year in 2015.

Smart meters record more information than current gas and electricity meters and will store the amount of energy used in each 30 minute period.

Lawrence Slade, Chief Operating Officer at Energy UK said: “The guidelines launched today are designed to ensure customers have a positive experience when their smart meters are installed. The rules are there to contribute to a smooth and successful roll-out of smart meters across the country.

“The commitment of ‘no sales at the installation visit’ will also mean that customers do not face any pressure to take out new products or services at the point of installation. They will however be guaranteed to get advice about how to use less energy in the home, which will be very welcome.”
Energy UK and its members, Consumer Future and a number of other stakeholders have contributed to the development of the guidelines.

Last year a report suggested British businesses could save around £230 on their energy bills every year by installing a smart meter.