New US efficiency rules to cut energy costs by $28bn

US consumers could cut their energy bills by up to $28 billion (£18bn) under new energy efficiency standards proposed by the Government. One of the rules is intended to improve […]

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By Priyanka Shrestha

US consumers could cut their energy bills by up to $28 billion (£18bn) under new energy efficiency standards proposed by the Government.

One of the rules is intended to improve efficiency for commercial refrigeration equipment such as restaurant-size fridges whilst another aims to improve standards for walk-in coolers and freezers such as milk displays in supermarkets.

The proposals aim to help achieve the goal set by President Barack Obama in his Climate Action Plan earlier this year, i.e. efficiency standards for appliances and federal buildings combined to cut carbon pollution by at least three billion metric tons by 2030.

The first rule if adopted is expected to reduce energy bills by up to $4 billion (£2.6bn) and carbon emissions by 55 metric tons over 30 years whilst the latter could cut up to $24 billion (£15.5bn) in energy costs and reduce emissions by 298 million metric tons in the same period, the US Energy Department said.

The total cut in emissions would be equivalent to taking nearly 109 million new cars off the road for a year whilst the energy saved would be equal to the amount of electricity used by 50 million homes a year.

Heather Zichal, Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change said: “Energy efficiency is one of the clearest and most cost-effective opportunities to save families money, make our businesses more competitive and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”

ELN recently reported the White House has started installing solar panels on the First Family’s residence in a bid to increase its energy efficiency.