US awards $45m for fuel efficient transport systems

A sum of $45 million (£28.7m) has been awarded for new research and development projects into cheaper and more fuel efficient transportation technologies in the US. The 38 projects announced […]

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By Priyanka Shrestha

A sum of $45 million (£28.7m) has been awarded for new research and development projects into cheaper and more fuel efficient transportation technologies in the US.

The 38 projects announced span five major areas such as affordable, efficient batteries, power electronics, fuels and lubricants and efficient heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems.

It builds on President Barack Obama’s Climate Action Plan announced earlier this year to build a 21st century transportation sector and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Obama Administration has established fuel economy standard for vehicles, which is expected to save consumers $1.7 trillion (£1.08tn) at the pump – or more than $8,000 (£5,100) in costs over the lifetime of each vehicle – while also eliminating six billion metric tons of carbon pollution.

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said: “By partnering with universities, private industry and our national labs, the Energy Department is helping to build a strong 21st century transportation sector that cuts harmful pollution, creates jobs and leads to a more sustainable energy future. By improving the fuel economy of our cars and trucks, we can save families and businesses money at the pump and better protect our air and water.”

Through the Advanced Vehicle Power Technology Alliance between the Energy Department and the Department of Army, the latter is contributing an extra $3 million (£1.91m) in co-funding to support projects focused on batteries, fuels and lubricants.

Earlier this year the International Energy Agency (IEA) said investing in efficient urban transport schemes could help save $70 trillion (£46.9tr) on vehicles, fuel and infrastructure spending between now and 2050.