British Land cuts tenants’ energy costs by £6.9m

Real estate company British Land said it has cut its commercial tenants’ energy costs by £6.9 million over the last five years. On Friday it announced carbon emissions fell by […]

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By Vicky Ellis

Real estate company British Land said it has cut its commercial tenants’ energy costs by £6.9 million over the last five years.

On Friday it announced carbon emissions fell by 37,000 tonnes across its portfolio since 2009. It has a 2015 target of emitting 40% less than 2009.

As for waste, the firm is on its way to “zero waste” next year, diverting 93% away from landfill according to the report.

A whopping 25 million sq ft of retail space is run by British Land across 66 retail parks, 85 superstores, 15 shopping centres, 12 department stores and 77 leisure sites.

Finance Director Lucinda Bell; 201 Bishopsgate and the Broadgate Tower. Image: British Land
Finance Director Lucinda Bell; 201 Bishopsgate and the Broadgate Tower. Image: British Land

London structures at 201 Bishopsgate and the Broadgate Tower (pictured, right) are part of its 7.3 million sq ft of office space.

Finance Director Lucinda Bell said: “It is in keeping with our business ethos and approach that the person responsible for the financial performance of company operations is also responsible for ensuring that this performance is achieved through responsible management of social, environmental and ethical issues.”

The firm’s Corporate Social Responsibility gives a snapshot into the size of its properties’ operational energy and water use – they churned out 847,000 tonnes of carbon this year.

It hailed the good progress of installing automatic meter reading at 98% of our retail properties and 91% of its office properties to cut energy costs and carbon emissions.

Completed Energy Performance Certificate assessments across our entire portfolio, identifying opportunities for further energy reductions.

Future challenges it pinpointed were reducing embodied carbon from materials and construction at developments and working with industry to launch a Landlord Energy Ratings similar to the National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS).