US invests $10m in software for electricity grids

The US Energy Department is spending more than $10 million (£5.94m) for software that will improve the efficiency of electricity grids. It is investing in six projects in five states […]

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By Priyanka Shrestha

The US Energy Department is spending more than $10 million (£5.94m) for software that will improve the efficiency of electricity grids.

It is investing in six projects in five states – California, Hawaii, Missouri, North Carolina and Washington – to deploy advanced software that works with a technology called synchrophasor, which measures voltage, current and frequency on grids.

That is expected to give utilities the ability to foresee and respond to quickly-changing grid conditions, make decisions that could prevent power outages, speed up restoration and improve day-to-day grid reliability.

Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for the Energy Department’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability said: “Through advanced sensors and monitoring devices, US utilities now have unprecedented insight into the power grid – helping industry make decisions that may prevent power outages before they happen and adeptly respond to changing grid conditions without disruption.”

There are currently around 1,700 synchrophasors connected to the US power grid compared to 200 in 2009.