Scotland calls for clarity on renewable projects

The UK Government is being urged to commit to installing renewable energy technologies on the Scottish Islands. Scotland’s Energy Minister Fergus Ewing has written to Energy secretary Amber Rudd ahead of […]

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The UK Government is being urged to commit to installing renewable energy technologies on the Scottish Islands.

Scotland’s Energy Minister Fergus Ewing has written to Energy secretary Amber Rudd ahead of the next Scottish Islands Delivery Forum which will meet in Glasgow next month.

Ms Rudd had previously agreed to co-chair the meeting after Mr Ewing invited her.

The Scottish Government claims David Cameron committed to the deployment of renewable energy on Scottish Islands earlier this year.

To assist with this former Energy Secretary Ed Davey pledged to publish information about Remote Island Wind Contract for Difference by July 2015 – which has now been delayed until sometime in the autumn of this year, it added.

Mr Ewing has urged Ms Rudd to provide more clarity on this issue which is seen as critical to the development before the next meeting.

Earlier this year the UK Government said new onshore wind farms in the UK will not receive public subsidies from April 2016.

He said: “The Scottish Islands are arguably the best places in Europe to deliver renewable energy. The wind speeds are the strongest and they have the best potential for wave and tidal energy in the future.”

He added fuel poverty in the islands “is the highest anywhere”.

He said: “I ask the UK Government provides certainty on its support for island developers no later than the next forum meeting.”

A DECC spokesperson said: “We’ve been clear that work is underway to set out the next stages in our long-term commitment to move to a low carbon economy and we’ll be announcing plans for the next CFD [contract for difference] allocation round in autumn this year.”

A new group which will find ways to tackle fuel poverty in Scotland has recently been established.

The number of Scottish companies, communities and farms generating their own electricity has risen by more than 50% in the last year, according to a new report.