Green lessons for US students

Two US universities have been granted $20,000 (£12,981) each for green infrastructure demonstration and training projects. Green infrastructure uses vegetation, soils and natural processes to manage rainwater – using it […]

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By Priyanka Shrestha

Two US universities have been granted $20,000 (£12,981) each for green infrastructure demonstration and training projects.

Green infrastructure uses vegetation, soils and natural processes to manage rainwater – using it as a resource rather than waste.

“It can enhance resiliency for communities and landscapes faced with water pollution and climate change impacts by increasing water supplies, reducing flooding, combatting urban heat island effect and improving water quality”, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which is providing the funding.

Students at Mississippi State University will design and build a 1,500 square foot rain garden to manage run-off from a nearby building and conduct water quality tests.

They will also install information kiosks to educate others about green infrastructure.

Kansas State University will use the cash to create “living laboratories” to conduct green infrastructure monitoring at two campus sites.

Ken Kopocis, EPA’s Deputy Assistant Administrator for water said: “By supporting projects like these two, colleges and universities can advance new ideas for green infrastructure to protect water quality. Kansas State and Mississippi State are showing a dedication to sustainable storm water management by educating the next generation of scientists, designers and engineers about green infrastructure.”