Lords Committee probes EU green energy market

An inquiry into energy governance in the European Union has been launched by the House of Lords EU Committee on Energy and Environment. It relates to how EU institutions and […]

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By Priyanka Shrestha

An inquiry into energy governance in the European Union has been launched by the House of Lords EU Committee on Energy and Environment.

It relates to how EU institutions and Member States interact, both formally and informally, in order to realise the energy policy objectives and fulfil national aims that have been set.

The inquiry will focus on renewable energy targets and capacity mechanisms, through which energy firms are paid by Member States for the power they generate.

“These will allow the committee to explore the topic in the context of national energy security on the one hand and national energy mix on the other”, it stated.

The European Commission’s ‘Energy Union Package’ aims to ensure the region has secure, affordable and climate-friendly energy, with responsibility for policy shared between Member States.

The Committee said it will investigate “potential tensions” between the EU and national objectives and seeks to bring them to “wider attention”.

It is inviting views until 2nd October following which a report will be published.

Baroness Scott of Needham Market, Chairman of the Committee, said: “The EU has some ambitious targets for renewable energy and Member States are increasingly making payments to energy companies to ensure continuity of supply but it is not entirely clear that EU countries are working together constructively to ensure we meet our national and collective targets.

“Our inquiry will attempt to get to the bottom of what a strengthened approach to EU energy governance could mean, how it can be enforced and what the implications might be of not making swift progress towards a clear governance system.”