UN group agrees first aircraft emission rules

Global aviation experts have agreed to the first emissions reduction standard for aircrafts. The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), a UN specialised agency, said the new CO2 emissions rule would […]

By Priyanka Shrestha

Global aviation experts have agreed to the first emissions reduction standard for aircrafts.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), a UN specialised agency, said the new CO2 emissions rule would apply to new aircraft designs from 2020 and new deliveries of current in-production aircraft types from 2023.

A cut-off date of 2028 for production of aircraft that do not comply with the standard has also been recommended by ICAO’s Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection.

The proposed global standard is “especially stringent” for larger aircrafts as those weighing more than 60 tonnes are said to account for more than 90% of international aviation emissions.

They also have the “broadest range” of emissions reduction technologies, the ICAO stated.

The new rule is expected to save up to 650 million tonnes of CO2 by 2040.

Olumuyiwa Benard Aliu, President of the ICAO Council added: “The goal of this process is ultimately to ensure that when the next generation of aircraft types enter service, there will be guaranteed reductions in international CO2 emissions. Our sector presently accounts for under 2% of the world’s annual CO2 emissions but we also recognise that the projected doubling of global passengers and flights by 2030 must be managed responsibly and sustainably.”

The standard, agreed after six years of negotiations, is expected to be formally adopted by the ICAO Council in early 2017.