New £200,000 CCS research launched in UK

The Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) has launched new research on carbon capture and storage. It will study the effects of removing brine from undersea stores that could be used to capture CO2. […]

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By Jacqueline Echevarria

The Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) has launched new research on carbon capture and storage.

It will study the effects of removing brine from undersea stores that could be used to capture CO2.

The £200,000 nine-month project will also focus on the impact brine production could have on reducing costs and risks of undersea CO2 storage.

Brine management is used within the oil and gas industry to control reservoir pressure and fluid flow.

One of ETI’s previous project, which estimated the capacity for 550 storage sites off the UK’s coast, found brine was not produced from the reservoir store before, during or after CO2 injection.

It believes if pressure builds within a store as a result of CO2 injection, then brine can potentially be removed from the store through a well to depressurise it while still retaining its operation.

The new research will be carried out by Heriot-Watt University, a founder member of the Scottish Carbon Capture & Storage (SCCS) research partnership.

Element Energy, T2 Petroleum Technology and Durham University will also participate in the project.

Paul Winstanley, ETI CCS Project Manager said: “Although the UK Government is no longer pursuing its CCS demonstration competition, ETI’s view remains that CCS offers long term the lowest cost solution to meeting the UK’s legally binding 2050 climate change targets.

“Without early demonstration of CCS, the country is placing much greater reliance on its ability to rapidly deploy the other tools it has such as renewables, new nuclear, bioenergy, low carbon heating and efficiency measures, which could double the cost of meeting UK energy and climate change targets with substantial increases in system costs appearing from 2020 onwards.”

A report from the UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC) launched last month highlighted the role of gas in the country’s energy future is “limited” without the use of CCS technologies.