Record breaking July brings world out in a sweat!

The average absolute value of the air temperature close to the Earth’s surface hit a new record in July. That’s according to meteorological data by EU’s Copernicus Climate Change Service which stated […]

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By Jacqueline Echevarria

The average absolute value of the air temperature close to the Earth’s surface hit a new record in July.

That’s according to meteorological data by EU’s Copernicus Climate Change Service which stated air temperature was 0.19°C higher than previous records in 2009 and 2015.

Global temperatures usually peak in July, varying by more than 3°C over the course of each year when the land masses of the northern hemisphere are on average at their warmest.

July this year was the warmest month of any on record, as it was more than 0.5°C warmer than the 1981 to 2010 average for the month.

The data also revealed each of the past 12 months hit the warmest on record for that particular period due to progressive global warming.

It added climate conditions were “exceptionally” warm over the north west of Russia where temperatures led to melting permafrost.

Furthermore, warmer conditions during both June and July coincided with many wildfires in Siberia.

Jean-Noël Thépaut, Head of the Copernicus Climate Change Service said: “These record breaking extremes are the result of a cocktail of weather phenomenon and human activity. There are higher than average temperatures over the vast majority of land and sea masses.

“We’re already seeing the human cost of hotter conditions with the impact of reported wildfires and other events. As well as continuing to reduce emissions, in particular in the context of the Paris Climate Change deal, it is incumbent on policymakers to use the monitoring and predictive information provided by Copernicus and other programmes to invest in resilience measures to mitigate the impact of climate change on industry and the public.”