Scientists say climate change is natural

  Two scientists proposed alternative theories for climate change to ELN at the ‘New Dawn of Truth’ climate conference in London last week. They disagree with the current global warming […]

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By Jonny Bairstow
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Two scientists proposed alternative theories for climate change to ELN at the ‘New Dawn of Truth’ climate conference in London last week.

They disagree with the current global warming narrative and even disagree with each other on some of the finer points.

One thing they do agree on is that carbon dioxide has nothing to do with climate change.

Geophysicist Dr Peter Ward believes explosive volcanoes cause climate cooling by sending particles through the atmosphere that reflect and scatter sunlight. He believes that the environment is heated by non-explosive effusive volcanoes erupting over thousands of years.

He said: “Carbon dioxide cannot physically cause global warming. It simply does not absorb enough heat.”

Dr Ward demonstrated his confidence and said: “I’m offering $10,000 (£7,510) of my children’s inheritance to the first scientist that can actually demonstrate that [carbon dioxide causes global warming], because I know now and my understanding of the physics, it’s physically impossible for that to happen.”

 

Dr Ned Nikolov, a physcial scientist working with the US Forest Service, told ELN he believes the climate has been in a process of cooling and now reached a plateau.

He said:” I don’t think there is a catastrophic climate change happening at all. It’s just cyclical, the warming that we have observed pretty much ended in the late 1990s so we are now at a plateau. The climate change we have been observing, in terms of temperature change is very, very small in terms of what has been happening geologically.”

Dr Nikolov’s theory is that climate change is caused by varying atmospheric pressure and cloud cover over a long period of time – he noted world temperatures have been much higher than they are today, at various points in the past.