‘Post-Brexit UK will become net importer of energy’

In the next few years the UK is likely to become a net importer of electricity. That’s according to Conservative MEP for Scotland, Ian Duncan, who spoke to ELN after a […]

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By Jonny Bairstow
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In the next few years the UK is likely to become a net importer of electricity.

That’s according to Conservative MEP for Scotland, Ian Duncan, who spoke to ELN after a Brexit panel discussion at London’s Imperial College.

He said this would happen mainly as a result of the country’s “decarbonising policies” to cut out fossil fuel generation such as coal and gas.

Mr Duncan added this would mean the UK will have to source the majority of its power from the continent, raising the question of how the nation will link up its energy markets with Europe after it leaves the EU.

He said: “We’re a popular market because we have high prices but again the more we link up, the lower those prices should become.

“I think in the years ahead, we’re an attractive market for Europe, so no doubt they will wish to trade their electricity and other commodities into that but at the same time, Brexit will change the regulatory regime.”

National Grid has suggested leaving the EU energy market could slow UK development and drive up the cost of imported power.