UK’s energy production in 2016 up 1.2%

Total energy production across the UK in 2016 was 1.2% higher than the year before. That’s according to new provisional data from the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy […]

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By Jonny Bairstow

Total energy production across the UK in 2016 was 1.2% higher than the year before.

That’s according to new provisional data from the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) that suggests this increase, which follows a rise of 9.6% between 2014 and 2015, was due to rises in output from the oil, gas, bioenergy and nuclear sectors.

Last year’s coal output fell to a record low level, whilst output from wind, solar and natural flow hydropower also decreased.

Total primary energy consumption was 1.5% lower than in 2015, deepening to 2.5% when weather differences are taken into account.

Final energy consumption was 1.1% higher than in 2015, with a fall in the industrial sector being offset by rises in the domestic, transport and services sectors.

On a seasonally and temperature adjusted basis, this figure changes to 0.6%.

Last year, net import dependency was 35.6% and both imports and exports fell. Fossil fuel dependency also hit an all time low at 81.5%.

In the fourth quarter of the year, total energy production was 1.8% lower than the same period in 2015.

The UK generated more electricity from wind farms than from coal-fired power plants for the first time ever last year.