Urban climate policies ‘could avoid 1.3m deaths by 2030’

A new report suggests implementing clean approaches could also create 14 million city-based jobs

  • The report says this would offer particular benefit to lower income groups in developing cities
  • It calls for more residential energy efficiency retrofits, district heating schemes and low carbon transport
  • Mayors, policymakers and citizens 'must embrace the pace and scale of action needed'

Pathway to COP26 report

City-focused climate policies could create 14 million urban jobs and avoid 1.3 million premature deaths each year before 2030.

That’s according to new research from C40 Cities, the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy and the NewClimate Institute, which suggest investments in residential energy efficiency retrofits could result in a net creation of 5.4 million jobs in cities around the world, reduce household bills and slash emissions.

It says improved bus services and public transport networks would be likely to prevent a million air pollution-related deaths every year by removing petrol and diesel cars from the roads, while district heating and cooling schemes could prevent a further 300,000 annual premature deaths, as well as create around 8.3 million jobs.

The report claims such policies would be of particular benefit to lower income groups in developing cities.

Mark Watts, Executive Director of C40 Cities, said: “We need cities around the world to implement the bold climate policies detailed in this report, if we are to avoid catastrophic climate change.

“By demonstrating that these measures will also create green jobs, save lives and cut consumer energy bills, we are making it even easier for mayors, policymakers and citizens to embrace the pace and scale of action needed.”

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