UK maritime sector begins clean shipping voyage

The Clean Maritime Council aims to devise a strategy to reduce emissions to improve air quality on and around waterways, ports and shipping lanes

By Priyanka Shrestha

Experts on clean shipping met yesterday to discuss the route to zero emissions for the UK maritime industry.

The Clean Maritime Council aims to devise a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the sector to improve air quality on and around waterways, ports and shipping lanes.

The experts range from industry leaders developing greener vessels to academics studying the economics of emissions reductions.

According to government statistics, domestic shipping accounted for 11% of the UK’s nitrogen oxide emissions in 2016.

The Clean Maritime Plan is to be published next year and will include policies to tackle emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases from shipping, while ensuring the UK can reap the economic benefits of the global transition to zero emission shipping.

Some of the UK’s current plans to reduce emissions from shipping are hybrid ferries using battery power alongside tradition engines used between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight and in Scotland and shore-side electricity at Portsmouth (MOD), Fraserburgh and Brodick to reduce engines running at ports.

Innovate UK is also funding a project in Orkney to directly inject hydrogen into the fuel supply of a ferry.

Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani said: “The UK maritime industry has a vital role in improving air quality on an around water and council members will be looking at innovative and practical ways to reduce emissions from the sector.

“The Clean Maritime Plan will bring new opportunities for Britain’s businesses to design, develop and sell green solutions to this global challenge.”

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