Poorest pay ‘three times more for their energy than the richest’  

New research shows lower income households spend on average £60 more every year on their energy bills than higher income households

The Big Zero report

Britain is suffering from energy inequality, as lower income households pay three times more for their energy than those with more money.

This is according to Compare The Market research, which shows lower income households spend on average £60 more every year on their energy bills than higher income households.

In the 10% most deprived areas of Britain, the annual cost of energy is £1,123. This is £60 per year, or 5.7%, more than the annual cost of energy in the tenth most affluent areas of England, which stands at £1,063.

The research analysed energy inequality across three specific metrics: deprived vs non deprived areas of Britain; lower vs higher household incomes; and the percentage of income households spend on their energy bills.

Energy inequality is also evident when looking at the percentage of income spent on energy bills. For the 10% of households with the lowest disposable income across Britain, energy spend makes up 7.8% of total weekly expenditure.

This is around three times more than the top 10% of the richest households’ relative spend on their energy bills.

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