South Korea to replace all diesel passenger trains with low carbon high-speed alternatives by 2029

The move is predicted to slash almost 30% of the carbon footprint of the trains used at the moment and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 70,000 tonnes

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South Korea plans to replace all diesel trains with eco-friendly alternatives by 2029 in a bid to drive down rail carbon dioxide emissions.

The move is predicted to slash almost 30% of the carbon footprint of the diesel trains used at the moment and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 70,000 tonnes, which is the equivalent of planting ten million trees.

Inaugurating the trial run of KTX-Eum, one of the country’s first low carbon high-speed trains, President of South Korea Moon Jae-in said: “Trains are one of the leading means of green transportation and the KTX-Eum is the best among them.

“Powered by electricity, it emits no fine dust while carbon dioxide emissions are only 70% of those from diesel-powered trains and 15% from passenger vehicles.

“By 2029, we will replace all of the diesel passenger locomotives with the KTX-Eum. Fast and eco-friendly rail transport will be expanded nationwide.”

Fine dust, known as PM2.5, consists of fine particulate matter that can be found in the air and its small size allows it to bypass people’s nose and throat and be absorbed by lungs and the bloodstream, leading to a variety of health problems.

A few months ago, Mr Moon Jae-in announced the country’s commitment to becoming carbon-neutral by 2050.

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