How could dance slash Glasgow nightclub’s emissions?

Andrew Fleming-Brown, Managing Director of the arts venue SWG3 spoke to ELN about the project that will capture body heat from customers before storing it into boreholes installed across the venue

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The heat produced on a Glasgow nightclub’s dancefloor is predicted to lower its carbon footprint.

Andrew Fleming-Brown, Managing Director of the arts venue SWG3 spoke to ELN about the project that will capture body heat from customers before storing it into boreholes installed across the venue: “We are installing about 17 boreholes around the venue, so there will be a ground source heat supply that comes from those boreholes.

“The excess heat that comes from the bodies of people dancing in the venue the thermal batteries of boreholes. And by doing that, it can be stored for a longer period of time and then can be redistributed as a heating and cooling load.”

The new system, named BODYHEAT, which is forecast to reduce the venue’s energy usage and save up to 70 tonnes of carbon per year, is expected to be introduced later this year.

Mr Fleming-Brown believes that the music industry has a significant role to play in sustainability and the fight against climate change: “It’s important to be kind of leading the way on these aspects of sustainability.

“We are already seeing artists who are asking about the kind of green footprint of the venue and who they are and what the energy supply is. And that’s going to increase.”

Listen to the interview.

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