Nuclear power to grow at a slower rate to 2030

Nuclear energy up to 2030 will grow at a rate slower than estimated a year ago. That’s the latest projection from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which said the […]

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By Priyanka Shrestha

Nuclear energy up to 2030 will grow at a rate slower than estimated a year ago.

That’s the latest projection from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which said the world’s installed nuclear capacity is expected to grow from 370GW right now to 456GWe in 2030, a 9% reduction from the level predicted in 2011.

The Agency said: “Continuing growth in nuclear power following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is expected, however at a rate lower than estimated a year ago.

“The projections made in 2011 after the accident indicated that it would slow the growth of nuclear power, but not reverse it. The 2012 updates, taking into account developments through April 2012, reinforce this conclusion but with a greater slowdown in growth.”

The prediction comes after the Japanese Government announced it will stop using nuclear power by 2040 last month and instead increase the use of renewable energy and import more oil, coal and gas for the future.

The predictions include both high and low projections and most of the growth is expected to occur in regions that already have operating nuclear power plants.

Projected growth could be strongest in China and the Republic of Korea. In Western Europe, the nuclear power capacity is projected to drop from 115GWe last year to 70GWe in 2030. In a higher projection, it is expected to increase to 148GWe.