Is Football the Next Wave of Renewable Energy?

Five Harvard students have created a concept football that is able to produce and store electricity whilst it is being played with. Dubbed the ‘Soccket’, this revolutionary ball is capable […]

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By Geoff Curran

Five Harvard students have created a concept football that is able to produce and store electricity whilst it is being played with.

Dubbed the ‘Soccket’, this revolutionary ball is capable of producing enough energy to power a light for around three hours, from being kicked around for just thirty minutes.

Using an induction coil fitted into the centre of it’s construction, the Soccket contains a magnet, which rapidly oscillates when the ball is in motion. This oscillation powers a motor, and the electricity is stored in an on-board battery.

An AC Adaptor is fitted behind one the panels of the Soccket, allowing a multitude of appliances to be powered in such a manner, though the designers – Jessica Lin, Julia Silverman, Jessica Matthews, Hemali Thakkaras and Aviva Presser – envision it’s best use is to charge mobile phones and power lights.

Many developing countries – where football is often the most popular pastime – rely on old kerosene lamps for light during the night.

These outdated light sources have often been associated with health problems, and the World Bank’s research suggests that burning these lamps indoors is the equivalent of smoking two packs of cigarettes a day.

As well as improving health, it would also be a huge improvement for the environment; kerosene lamps generate 190 million metric tons carbon dioxide emissions per year: the equivalent emissions of about 38 million automobiles.

As well as having won praise from various philanthropic organisations, the Soccket can also boast presidential backing, as Bill Clinton has thrown his support behind the invention, dubbing it ‘extraordinary’.

To see the Soccket in action, click here.