Fracking payments for householders: Reactions

  The government’s plan to give cash payment to those who live near shale exploration sites has received mixed reactions. UK Onshore Oil and Gas (UKOOG) has welcomed the news […]

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By Jacqueline Echevarria
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The government’s plan to give cash payment to those who live near shale exploration sites has received mixed reactions.

UK Onshore Oil and Gas (UKOOG) has welcomed the news as they believe “local people should share in the success of the industry and be rewarded for hosting sites on behalf of others in the country.”

Ken Cronin, Chief Executive added: “The overarching objectives of secure, affordable and low carbon energy continue to be a driving force for our industry. Just 12 years ago, Britain was a net exporter of gas but imports now make up nearly half of our gas demand at a cost to this country of around £10 million a day.

“Recent estimates by National Grid are that, without shale, the UK could be importing over 90% of its gas by 2040.”

However, environmental campaigners are still concerned about shale exploration in the country.

Greenpeace UK Chief Scientist Doug Parr said: “The government has tried to sweeten the fracking pill with cash payments before and it didn’t worked. Over the last two years, public opposition has soared and support for shale has tanked. People’s concerns about climate change and their local environment cannot be silenced with a wad of cash. You can’t put a price on the quality of the air you breathe, the water you drink, and the beauty of our countryside.

“If Theresa May wants to show the UK is open for business, she should reverse the policies that have harmed our vibrant clean energy sector and back the technologies that can supply cheap, homegrown energy for decades to come.”

Friends of the Earth (FoE) insists “communities across the UK have made it clear that they don’t want fracking.”

Tony Bosworth, FoE campaigner added: “A YouGov survey for the Sunday Times last year showed that, even where communities were offered £1 million, they still remained opposed to fracking taking place near them.

“Local people won’t suddenly be bribed into accepting this unpopular practice, which poses risks to people and the environment.”

We have also asked the general public if they would receive money to allow fracking near their houses.