London’s ‘Walkie Talkie’ tower gets fuel cell plant

Calling green energy fans, over – the latest addition to London’s skyline will be powered by fuel cell technology. Dubbed the ‘Walkie Talkie’ tower because of its architectural shape, the […]

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By Vicky Ellis

Calling green energy fans, over – the latest addition to London’s skyline will be powered by fuel cell technology.

Dubbed the ‘Walkie Talkie’ tower because of its architectural shape, the 38 storey office building on 20 Fenchurch Street which is being built (artists’ interpretation, pictured) will install a 300kW fuel cell power plant next year.

Edinburgh-based Logan Energy won a £1.3million contract to install the power plant in the building across the River Thames from the Shard.

This should mark a notch in the green bedpost for Mayor of London Boris Johnson, who wants a quarter of the capital’s energy to come from decentralised sources with the resulting CO2 emissions to be slashed 60% by 2025.

Fuel cells create power with an electrochemical reaction rather than burning, turning fuel into electricity and heat for underfloor heating, chilled water and steam. This means it emits a minimal amount of pollutants such as nitrous oxide, sulphur dioxide and particulate matter.

The City of London tower which has 690,000 square foot of space will use German kit from the firm Fuel Cell Energy Solutions in a combined cooling, heat and power (CCHP) technology.

Paul Mutti, Construction Manager at Canary Wharf Contractors which is building the site said: “The high efficiency of the stationary fuel cell power plant is very important for this building, from both an economical as well as sustainability viewpoint.

“The design of the building incorporates the latest advances in efficiency and conservation to minimise the building’s environmental impact, including re-use of the demolition material from the prior building, utilisation of solar shading and window glazing that conserves energy and the fuel cell power plant that economically generates both electricity and heat with virtually no emissions.”