EU cut greenhouse gas emissions by 3.8% in 2019

That’s according to the latest data by the European Environment Agency, which suggests the decrease brought member states’ emissions to 24% below 1990 levels

The Big Zero report

Europe saw an estimated 3.8% drop in its greenhouse gas emissions in 2019, compared to 2018.

That’s according to the latest data by the European Environment Agency (EEA) which suggests the decrease brought member states’ emissions to 24% below 1990 levels.

This figure increases further to 25.9% if carbon dioxide removals from land use and forestry activities are included.

The EEA notes nearly 80% of the reduction in emissions came from the heat and energy sectors, with increasing carbon prices and lower gas costs leading to a decrease in coal use.

The data suggests emissions also decreased in other industrial sectors and residential buildings as a result of a warmer winter and lower demand for heating.

However, the report stresses carbon dioxide emissions from transport continued their trend of increasing in 2019.

For road transport, the increase was due to higher gasoline consumption in passenger cars.

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