DECC sheds light on turbine shadow

An independent research study into the phenomenon of shadow flicker from wind turbines was today published by the Department of Energy and Climate Change. The flickering effect is caused when […]

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By Sumit Bose

An independent research study into the phenomenon of shadow flicker from wind turbines was today published by the Department of Energy and Climate Change.

The flickering effect is caused when rotating blades periodically cast shadows through constrained openings such as the windows of neighbouring properties. It can be not just an eyesore but a serious complaint which has to be considered during planning applications.

The study, commissioned from engineering consultants Parsons Brinckerhoff found that there was not any major issues of shadow flicker in the UK, the rate of flickering isn’t a significant risk to public health and in the rare cases where it was a problem, flexible shut down measures could solve issues.

The report was peer reviewed by independent experts. The Government has considered the report’s findings and concluded that existing planning guidance on shadow flicker is fit for purpose and no changes are needed.

Charles Hendry, Minister of State for Energy and Climate Change said: “It is vital that we use the most up to date, robust and accurate scientific evidence when looking at the impact of wind farms on communities. This study will be helpful to communities, developers and planners as they assess proposals for onshore wind projects.”