Scotland sees increase in food waste fuel

The anaerobic digestion (AD) industry, which turns food and farm waste into electricity, has grown by more than two-thirds in Scotland. Around 27 AD projects are currently running in the […]

The anaerobic digestion (AD) industry, which turns food and farm waste into electricity, has grown by more than two-thirds in Scotland.

Around 27 AD projects are currently running in the country.

That’s an increase of 69% in the last 12 months, figures from the Anaerobic Digestion and Bioresources Association (ADBA) revealed.

A further 43 projects have won planning approval.

The AD process involves farm slurry, vegetable peelings, paper and other organic material decomposing inside a closed chamber to produce gas, which is then used to generate electricity.

The ADBA believes the sector could grow by more than 200% in the next two years.

Charlotte Morton, Chief Executive of ADBA said: “Scotland is leading the way in demonstrating how anaerobic digestion extracts value from our waste, while supporting farming resilience, reducing billions in carbon abatement costs, improving food security and production and generating employment and investment opportunities for rural economies.

“We are particularly excited to see AD plants working in partnership with local authorities to collect residents’ food waste and to distribute in its place heat and electricity for local homes.”

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