UK awards £23m boost for EV battery technologies

The government is offering a share of the funding to businesses ranging from small designers to major car manufacturers

The UK Government has announced £23 million of new funding to help large and small businesses develop electric vehicle (EV) battery technologies.

The funding aims to ensure the UK remains at the forefront of progress in the sector, which it notes is a “crucial part of the UK’s move towards a net zero emissions economy”.

The Faraday Battery Challenge aims to facilitate the creation of safe, cost-effective, durable, lightweight, higher performing and recyclable batteries.

Winners of the latest funding round include mining consultancy Wardell Armstrong, which will work with the Natural History Museum and mining firm Cornish Lithium to develop a consistent supply of lithium for the UK – this will be essential in creating enough batteries to meet demand.

Other recipients are Jaguar Land Rover, which will lead a project to maximise battery performance while maintaining safety, as well as an initiative led by Granta Design to use artificial intelligence in battery manufacture.

Business and Energy Secretary, Greg Clark, said: “We are committed to ensuring our world-leading automotive sector can flourish. These exciting new projects will build on the UK’s reputation for excellence, our rich heritage in the auto industry and pave the way for advances towards a cleaner economy.

“We will continue to invest in future car manufacturing, batteries and electrification infrastructure through our modern Industrial Strategy and today’s winners will be crucial in ensuring that the UK leads the world in the global transition to a low carbon economy – one of the greatest industrial opportunities of our time.”

As part of a separate competition, 32 companies working across five different projects, are to receive a share of £33 million to accelerate low carbon car technologies in the UK.

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