Businesses and utilities should deal with drought

As the South East embarks on a hosepipe ban today, the utilities expect to save water through their customers using less. However, some say we shouldn’t be relying on the […]

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By Tom Gibson

As the South East embarks on a hosepipe ban today, the utilities expect to save water through their customers using less. However, some say we shouldn’t be relying on the average consumer to skip their daily shower and instead should focus on improving our waste in general.

Peter Grant, CEO of environmental efficiency firm CloudApps said: “Focusing on and restricting consumer use has been the ‘go-to’ solution to overcome water shortages and unnecessary pressure has been put on them as a result. Residents will have to spend time finding other alternatives and worry about following the law.”

Seven water companies have adopted the hosepipe ban, which is set to affect 20 million people. One of those, Anglian Water, launched a ‘Drop 20’ campaign, which challenges people to reduce their daily personal water use from 145 litres – the current regional average – to 125 litres.

However, when around 60% of UK water is used by business, Cloudapps think the attention must be shifted from private to corporate.

Mr Grant added: “This pressure can be alleviated by capturing and reducing business usage. Savings can be made in business, which used 6.3 billion cubic metres of water in total last year. It makes business sense and it is fair to the public.”

Martin Baggs, chief executive of Thames Water said a hosepipe ban was the best option: “Imposing restrictions on the use of hosepipes, although regrettable, is the most sensible and responsible next step in encouraging everyone to use less water.”

“People often wonder what the benefit of a hosepipe ban is until you explain that running a sprinkler for an hour uses as much water as a family of four uses in a whole day. Right now families’ needs must come first. This really is the most responsible thing to do.”