Global Energy Prize goes to rechargeable batteries

The maker of rechargeable batteries used in electric cars has won a Global Energy Prize, it was announced this week. The awards recognise outstanding achievements across the world in energy […]

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By Vicky Ellis

The maker of rechargeable batteries used in electric cars has won a Global Energy Prize, it was announced this week.

The awards recognise outstanding achievements across the world in energy research and technology and come with a total $1.2 million (£790m) to help laureates fund future research projects.

Japanese scientist Dr Akira Yoshino won the gong for his work in developing the lithium-ion rechargeable battery in 1985. Batteries with the basic technology are used in mobile phones and electric and hybrid electric cars.

Dr Akira is a Fellow at the Asahi Kasei Corporation and is President of the Lithium Ion Battery Technology and Evaluation Centre (LIBTEC) in Japan. He said at the ceremony yesterday: “It is a tremendous honour to be here among this distinguished crowd and to be recognised in this way. I’m very humbled by this.”

Russian scientist Vladimir Evgenyevich Fortov of the Russian Academy of Sciences also won for his research in physics, examining thermodynamic, thermophysical, electrophysical, and electronic properties of fluids and building materials.

Last year UK chemical engineer Rodney John Allam shared the award with two Russian scientists.