Jordan loan to help “acute” energy shortage

Jordan has bagged a $3 million (£1.8m) loan to tackle its acute energy shortage by improving the efficiency of its water sector. The Middle Eastern nation which stretches along the […]

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By Vicky Ellis

Jordan has bagged a $3 million (£1.8m) loan to tackle its acute energy shortage by improving the efficiency of its water sector.

The Middle Eastern nation which stretches along the Dead Sea has a population of 3.18 million (2012) and depends on imports for most of its power.

It could meet only 3% of its total energy needs with local oil and gas in 2011, the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources said in a report.

Cash from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development will go to local energy service companies (ESCOs) owned by operations and maintenance firm Engicon for bettering water and waste water management.

Part of the money will go to modernising the Wala and Lib water pumping stations that serve the town of Madaba, south of the capital Amman (pictured), lowering costs for the Water Authority of Jordan.

Heike Harmgart, Head of the EBRD office in Jordan said: “Energy is an acute problem in Jordan and this partnership will contribute to the increased use of energy-saving measures.”

Jordan has a target of boosting new and renewable energy’s share to 7% by 2015 and 10% by 2020.