‘Nine in 10 diesel cars exceeding EU pollution limits’

Major car manufacturers are selling diesel cars which don’t meet the EU air pollution limits, a new report claims. Transport & Environment (T&E) revealed only one in 10 new cars […]

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By Jacqueline Echevarria

Major car manufacturers are selling diesel cars which don’t meet the EU air pollution limits, a new report claims.

Transport & Environment (T&E) revealed only one in 10 new cars complied the Euro 6 auto emissions standard set on September last year.

Under the new regulation, diesel cars can have a maximum permitted level of 80mg/km of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx).

The report found on average the emissions produced by new EU diesel cars are five times higher than the allowance.

The group tested 23 cars and only three achieved the standards on the road.

According to T&E, manufacturers use “cheaper and less effective” exhaust systems to produce the cars.

It added diesel cars sold by the same manufacturers in the US use better exhaust treatment systems and produce lower emissions.

The cost to manufacturers of a modern diesel after-treatment system is around €300 (£216) per car, said the report.

Greg Archer, T&E’s clean vehicles manager, said: “Every new diesel car should now be clean but just one in 10 actually is. This is the main cause of the air pollution crisis affecting cities. Car makers sell clean diesels in the US and testing should require manufacturers to sell them in Europe too.”