Low carbon energy accounted for 42.9% of UK’s supply in 2015

Low carbon energy sources accounted for 42.9% of the UK’s electricity supply in 2015. According to provisional data from DECC, that was due to higher generation from nuclear power plants, which […]

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By Jacqueline Echevarria

Low carbon energy sources accounted for 42.9% of the UK’s electricity supply in 2015.

According to provisional data from DECC, that was due to higher generation from nuclear power plants, which accounted for 23% of output last year.

A growth in renewables, mainly from wind farms, also helped in boosting low carbon production, it added.

Primary energy generation rose by 9% on a year earlier to 123.1 million tonnes of oil equivalent. This first increase since 1999 was due to a rise in oil and gas output.

Production of crude oil rose by 12.8% due to the start-up of new fields and less maintenance activity.

Gas production increased by 8.5% – the first “significant” rise since 2000, stated DECC.

Norway remains the key source of imports, accounting for 61%.

LNG imports were also up by 21%, with Qatar exporting 92% to the UK.

Production of coal fell by 27% to a “record low” due to mine closures and other mines producing less coal as they come to the end of operation.

Last year the government announced it plans to close coal-fired power plants by 2025.