Turkey and Egypt ‘need to tap bioenergy potential’

Turkey and Egypt could have huge untapped bioenergy potential. That’s according to a new study by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). […]

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By Jonny Bairstow

Turkey and Egypt could have huge untapped bioenergy potential.

That’s according to a new study by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO).

The report suggests the combined biomass from the two countries could generate enough electricity to supply 700,000 homes and enough renewable fuels to replace more than two million tonnes of oil each year.

Turkey aims to increase the share of renewable energy in its generation mix from 13.5% in 2013 to 20.5% in 2023.

This increase could be achieved just by utilising the 25 million tonnes sunflower, maize and cotton and 150 million tonnes of livestock residues from cattle buffalo and chickens  available.

The report suggests this could generate more than 1GW of electricity, or 100% of the national target for renewable energy from biomass.

It would also slash greenhouse gas emissions by six million tonnes each year, roughly equivalent to the emissions from more than 1.3 million passenger cars.

Egypt currently ranks amongst the 11 fastest growing greenhouse gas emitters in the world but aims for renewables to make up a fifth of the country’s energy mix by 2020.

The estimated availability of five million tonnes of crop residues and 14 million tonnes of livestock residues could unlock an energy potential of more than 750MW, equivalent to 7% of the above target.

It would reduce annual emissions by around 6.5 million tonnes, roughly the same as 1.4 million cars on the road.

A new ‘megaproject’ in Egypt will provide a capacity of 14.4GW, boosting the country’s generation capacity by 45%.