Solihull brothers fined £400k after e-waste fraud worth £1.48m

An investigation found one of the brothers submitted fictitious claims for the recycling of around 10,600 tonnes of e-waste, with his company receiving payment to the value of £1.48m from a producer compliance scheme

Big Zero Report 2022

Two brothers from Solihull have been ordered to pay nearly £400,000 following a fraud case worth £1.48 million involving waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).

Jamil Rehman, 58, of Appleby Grove and Saleem Rehman, 57, of Buckbury Croft, have been fined £295,965 and £100,000 respectively after hearings at Birmingham Crown Court on 31st January and 2nd February 2022.

The orders follow an investigation which detailed how Jamil, who was the sole director of Electronic Waste Specialists Ltd (EWS), had submitted fictitious claims for the recycling of around 10,600 tonnes of e-waste, with his company receiving payment to the value of £1.48 million from a producer compliance scheme, Weeelight Ltd.

Jamil admitted to one charge of trading fraudulently between October 2011 and January 2012 and his brother Saleem admitted to one charge of theft from the company.

On 6th January 2020, Jamil received a custodial sentence of five years four months while Saleem was given a 16-month prison sentence, suspended for two years.

Following these sentences, the Environment Agency carried out a confiscation investigation and at a hearing in January this year, Saleem was ordered to pay £100,000 within three months with a default sentence of two years imprisonment for not paying within that period.

The court determined he had benefitted in the sum of £100,000 and that this was also his available amount.

Neil Campbell, from the Environment Agency’s national enforcement team said: “The case shows that the Environment Agency is not just content to prosecute for illegal waste operations but will also come after those who profit illegally to recoup taxpayers’ money spent on pursuing them.

Waste crime can have a serious environmental impact and puts communities at risk. It undermines legitimate business and the investment and economic growth that go with it.

“We support legitimate businesses and are proactively supporting them by disrupting and stopping the criminal element backed up by the threat of tough enforcement as in this case.”

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