Blog: Can public hatred of politicians be saved by singing MPs?

Has a singing politician Down Under set a ground-breaking precedent in 21st century politicking? There was one ray of light in the dust storm of disapproval felt by the Australian […]

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By Vicky Ellis

Has a singing politician Down Under set a ground-breaking precedent in 21st century politicking?

There was one ray of light in the dust storm of disapproval felt by the Australian government this week after its controversial carbon tax came into effect.

Protestors in Sydney poured their scorn on Aussie PM Julia Gillard – and her opposition counterpart Tony Abbott packed no punches in slamming the tax, claiming towns such as Whyalla would be wiped off the map.

But MP Craig Emerson gamely defended the tax by bursting into song in a television interview. To the tune of a 1970s track by the Skyhooks, he crooned “No Whyalla wipeout there on my TV”. Needless to say, online clips of the stunt went viral.

It might have been off key and totally out of time with the impromptu backing track you presume one of his aides provided with a boom box somewhere off camera.

But could it also have given our British MPs a novel way of negotiating in the public eye?

Maybe Speaker of the House John Bercow could open the Commons with a cheery chorus. I would love to see him instruct mouthy backbenchers to behave properly with the words of one hit wonder Fedde Le Grand: “Put your hands up – put your hands up for Detroit!”

Prime Minister’s Questions every week could be restyled as a rap battle, Cameron vs Miliband – I can confidently predict the inevitable “Calm Down Dear” remix will be a Youtube phenomenon.

For the next Energy Bill announcement perhaps we can expect Charles Hendry and Greg Barker to play backing singers to Ed Davey’s diva, “R-E-S-P-E-C-T, show how much wind means to me!”

Or maybe not… But I’ve got my fingers crossed for the next election. If only Boris was still an MP. If he finally gets one over Cameron, you can bet he would be game.