Irish energy from waste plant approved

Planning permission has been granted for an energy from waste plant in Northern Ireland which turns rubbish into gas rather than burning it directly. The Lisburn plant (pictured, artist’s impression) […]

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By Vicky Ellis

Planning permission has been granted for an energy from waste plant in Northern Ireland which turns rubbish into gas rather than burning it directly.

The Lisburn plant (pictured, artist’s impression) will take 80,000 tonnes of non-recyclable waste and convert it into a gas with a two-stage heating process.

The gas is then burnt to generate heat, which is used to produce steam and electricity.

Alex Attwood, Environment Minister for Northern Ireland who approved the plant said: ” I am a firm supporter of energy from waste opportunities and of alternative, more environmentally sustainable energy plans. This facility will deal with our waste, prevent landfill and create renewable energy.”

Energy specialist Energos which is building the 7MW plant says this is enough to power 17,000 homes and could also provide affordable heat in the form of steam or hot water for local industries and homes.

The company is currently building its second UK gasification facility at Glasgow City Council’s Recycling and Renewable Energy Centre and is also involved with a proposed waste recovery park in Milton Keynes.