Oyster farmers trawl for Fyne carbon savings

Loch Fyne is scaling up its ambitions for cutting carbon emissions with a major review of its energy use. The check-up will focus mainly on its oyster and seafood farming business which exports […]

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By Vicky Ellis

Loch Fyne is scaling up its ambitions for cutting carbon emissions with a major review of its energy use.

The check-up will focus mainly on its oyster and seafood farming business which exports to 20 countries.

Eventually it will take in the 40 restaurants around the country.

Loch Fyne’s Facilities Manager John Meaney said energy efficiency was one of the main aims of the business in 2015.

“Our whole business model is based around keeping our environmental impact to a minimum and we are always looking for ways to cut our carbon footprint even further, something that is a huge challenge for food businesses,” he said.

Mini hydropower projects and the use of “grey water” – wastewater, for example from hand wash basins or showers, which can be recycled in toilets – are being looked at.

Meanwhile it is working with Glasgow energy management consultancy Orchard Energy to get a grip on its energy reduction plans.

Gareth Henderson, Managing Director at Orchard Energy said: “Understanding how energy is used across the business will be the first step in identifying which energy efficient technologies and operational changes will be most effective in cutting carbon emissions.”