Keeping air pollution at lockdown levels could ‘halve number of children with poor lung function’

The reduction in air pollution seen during the country-wide lockdown led to a decrease in asthma attacks in children, according to a new report

Cutting air pollution by the levels seen during lockdown could halve the number of children with lung function so poor it affects their everyday lives.

That’s according to a new analysis by the Queen Mary University of London on behalf of the charities Global Action Plan and Philips Foundation, which suggests the reduction in air pollution seen during the country-wide lockdown led to a significant decrease in asthma attacks in children.

The charities have launched a free online tool which offers suggests plans and actions for teachers across the UK and Ireland to tackle air pollution in and around the schools.

Chris Large, Co-CEO at Global Action Plan, said: “Protecting today’s generation of school children against the toxins carried by air pollution is not only imperative to preventing damageto children’s daily health but also to reduce the impact of this pandemic and future pandemics.” 

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