New Rolls-Royce facility in Bristol to develop cleaner and efficient jet engine tech

The composite technology hub will manufacture fan blades and fan cases that are expected to significantly reduce weight in a jet engine, lowering both fuel consumption and emissions

Rolls-Royce has opened a new facility in Bristol that will develop jet engine technologies that are cleaner, quieter and more efficient.

The composite technology hub will manufacture fan blades and fan cases that are expected to significantly reduce weight in a jet engine, lowering both fuel consumption and emissions.

It will focus on carbon fibre composites, which are used in the aerospace industry to significantly reduce weight.

A Rolls-Royce fan system made with carbon-fibre composites can save almost 700kg per aircraft, the equivalent of seven passengers and their luggage.

The lighter the engine, the less fuel it burns, emitting less carbon emissions.

Rolls-Royce said the facility, which has secured 150 jobs in Bristol, will use “low energy, very low emission processes” and maximise the use of raw materials, enabling the reduction of waste.

It supports the company’s target of achieving zero emissions at its operations and facilities by 2030 – excluding power generation and test operations..

Alan Newby, Rolls-Royce, Director, Aerospace Technology and Future Programmes said: “This incredible new facility exemplifies our commitment to creating cleaner, more efficient forms of power. Our highly-skilled employees will use the latest technology, materials and manufacturing techniques to develop components that will contribute to lighter, quieter, more powerful jet engines with fewer emissions.”

An existing composite manufacturing technology facility, along with around 30 employees, has been transferred from the Isle of Wight.

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