Growing number of people support “consumer strike on energy bills”

Money Saving Expert Founder has said the UK is heading for a “national financial cataclysm”

Big Zero Report 2022

More and more Britons are supporting a movement to stop paying energy bills this autumn.

Speaking to the ITV’s Peston programme, Founder of Money Saving Expert Martin Lewis said the UK is currently on the verge of civil unrest triggered by the rising cost of living.

A few days ago, ELN reported that a new campaign aimed at gathering one million signatures from people who would stop paying their energy bills was launched.

Mr Lewis said: “I am seeing an increasing growth of people calling for non-payment of the energy bills process.

“Many people are spontaneously calling for that. We are getting close to a poll tax moment on energy bills coming into October and we need the government to get a handle on that.

“Because, of course, once it becomes socially acceptable not to pay energy bills, people will stop paying energy bills. How do you enforce it? You are not going to cut people off.”

Recent research estimated that the winter price cap is set to reach £3,300.

Asked about the current economic situation, Mr Lewis replied: “I think we are heading for potentially a national financial cataclysm this winter. It is a huge combination of factors but it is centered around energy.”

He said the measures announced by the government in May came at a time when analysts predicted that the price cap could rise to £2,800.

Martin Lewis said: “Unfortunately, that prediction has exploded. We are now expecting it to go to around £3,240 – it’s a 65% rise and that comes on top of the 54% rise we saw in April.

“So, year-on-year compared to last October, we are talking £2,000 more for energy and it won’t stop there.”

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